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to a cease-fire. a deal was announced in cairo by secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister. israel agreed to stop air strikes in gaza, where at least 161 palestinians have been killed since last wednesday. hamas promised to stop firing rockets which have killed five israelis. there were fears the deal might not happen after a bomb went off on a bus in tel aviv this morning. 27 people were hurt, no one has claimed responsibility. we have reports from gaza and israel tonight. we begin with clarissa ward in cairo, where that cease-fire was brokered. >> reporter: after 24 hours of intense shuttle diplomacy, secretary clinton walked away with what she came for: a cease- fire agreement between israel and hamas that she called the first step in a long process. >> the people of this region deserve the chance to live free today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike
-fire that starts at 11 a.m. sharp. >> reporter: right now is hour time, 9:30 p.m. in cairo where the agreement was reached about 90 minutes ago. we want to take you live to jerusalem to israel this is israeli president benjamin netanyahu. he has confirmed the truce this morning he's speaking live. he says he agreed after consulting with president obama. you see him wrapping up his remarks now. also we want to show you this video, secretary of state clinton in cairo. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza the rocket attacks must end a calm returns. the people of this region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence, today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> reporter: just a few hours ago the violence was escalating. israel launched rapid fire airstrikes on gaza city after a small militant group set off a bomb on a bus full of civilians in tel aviv, 27 people were hurt. the cease-fire reached just now, beginning just now, includes that after 24 hours of quiet gaza's border crossings with israel will be open. over t
. >>> and now to egypt. demonstrators there have taken to the streets in cairo to protest against president mohamed morsi. morsi expanded his powers this week, and that means no one can challenge his decisions. they can't be overturned. that's led to anger among the people and some of the judges. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. >> reporter: thanks have calmed down considerably in cairo's tahrir square. still demonstrators out in tahrir, especially those who pitched tents overnight but the numbers not as what we saw on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express wha
cambodia, first to jerusalem, then to the west bank, back to jerusalem and then cairo, in a frantic search for a cease-fire. all day, a truce seemed to be negotiated by israeli bombardment by sea and air and hamas rockets. prospects seemed bleak until the sudden announcement. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. >> reporter: the gunfire in gaza turned to bursts of celebration. but in jerusalem, israel's leaders briefed the nation on the deal grim faced. a deal which seemed beyond reach this morning. the first bus bombing in israel since 2006, in the heart of tel aviv, across the street from the defense ministry. we found the bus cleaved open. and anger. this eyewitness told me he thought it was a rocket, saying that israel can't go on like this, that it must invade gaza. more than 20 wounded by what police say was an ied and the suspect, still at large. even with the cease-fire, the guns weren't silenced. as many as 20 rockets fired out of gaza, hours after the deal was inked. now,
forced from power from popular revolt. joining me is reza. in cairo. and we also have a senior fellow here in new york. the egyptian prime minister met with hamas today and he classified hamas as a terrorist organization. should washington be concerned about israel's role in the conflict. >> reporter: anderson, it's impossible to say what egypt's role is at this point. it is not clear at this point if the fiery rhetoric is just rhetoric or if there's something beyond that or prepare for example more drastic measures. i think we'll find out in the days and weeks to come, but people in washington are listening to this explosive rhetoric and they are concerned, but if you look carefully there's not much happening beyond the rhetoric. i don't think egypt can describe this and viewed as extreme, belligerent departure from the past and they certainly haven't taken arms against israel will and providing material support to hamas and they've come out and said loud and clear that we're going to abide by the camp david accords, the peace accords between camp david and israel and these are all e
brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ye
. in cairo's tahrir square, thousands are chanting for regime change. they say egypt's new president is acting like a dictator. president mohamed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers yesterday, basically morsi now has absolute power for six months. his opponents say he's acting like a new pharaoh. the u.s. state department is calling for calm and encouraging all parties to work together. morsi declared all his laws, all his decrees are final and cannot be overturned or appealed until egypt's new constitution is put in place. just days ago, people around the world were praising morsi for his pivotal role in negotiating the israel/hamas cease-fire. today, protesters set fire to a symbol of morsi's power, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in alexandria, egypt. morsi supporters clashed with protesters there. morsi is defending his new powers, saying he's not taking sides and the steps he took are meant to achieve political and social stability. reza sayah joins us live in cairo. reza, is morsi's government strong enough, so early in this administration, to withstand this level of
has more from cairo. >> yeg, some dramatic developments here in cairo. egypt's president trying to expand his own powers dramatically, saying that any of his presidential decrees issued since he took office six months ago cannot be overturned by anybody, including the courts. and that those previous officials who could be implicated in murdering demonstrators during the revolution a year ago would be retried. as one morsey opponent put it, he is basically putting himself above the having no one to check his powers. we have seen street protests. those protests could grow dramatically with these new announcements by the egyptian president. it comes on the heels of a real diplomatic success in the world spotlight here. president morsey helping to negotiate a cease-fire between israel and hamas. really, making the unusual step of receiving praise from all sides from u.s. officials from hamas, even from some israeli officials for his pragmatism but certainly that imagine that tism in its own rule here could be put to the test almost immediately. with new decrees expanding his power,
defense programs clinton sealed the deal, next went to jerusalem and finally cairo. for final talks with egypt's leaders. nbc's jim maceda has more. >> reporter: morsi, the former muslim brotherhood leader has boosted his credibility with u.s. and israel, and has become a politician to deal with in the arab world but it is one thing to broker a cease-fire, now he will have to enforce it and crack down on hamas and their weapons smuggling >> reporter: president obama who visited israel as a candidate four years ago but not since has to decide his next steps. >> the first thing he has to do is decide whether or not he is going to invest in the effort to resolve the israeli-palestinian conflict. i think at the moment it is a stain on his legacy. >> reporter: the u.s. officials are looking at what could be the birth of a new start with the less clear is how the u.s. will handle hamas, which is clearly empowered >>> and now, how all of this is playing out in israel and gaza, nbc's veteran middle east correspondent martin fletcher is in tel aviv tonight. and our chief foreign corresponden
by the u.s. embassy in cairo and evolved into a direct assault against the u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi and subsequently its annex. the white house edit didn't even make it into the final version. we invited congressman king and he declined due to a scheduling conflict and tonight there's another development on the talking points. senior congressional correspondent dana bash joins me tonight. does he seem to be pointing a finger necessarily at the white house now, and he does think the talking points are aerlted, is that right? >> he does still think they've been altered and it turns out that today it does appear to be right, anderson. pam benson was told that the original draft of the unclassified talking points to be sent to the intelligence committee did suggest that the benghazi attack had links to al qaeda. it was taken out, but the senior official with knowledge of this process says it was not taken out by the white house and it wasn't a white house decision, but a joint interagency decision. they decided to tone it down and they replaced it with the term extremists and the reason
this thing will last. gregg: did secretary clinton's shuttle diplomacy from jerusalem to cairo prove pen official here? >> -- beneficial here in. >> yes, certainly. the administration deserves credit, to be sure, but it's not a major victory in the sense that we have a middle east peace which has been as elusive to this administration as it has been to the previous ones. but at the end of her reign as secretary of state, her tenure is coming to conclusion with mounting criticism over benghazi and the lack of security, this certainly is a plus. gregg: are you surprised at how helpful the new islamist government of muhammad morsi really was in this process as a mediator standing up for the truce, probably pressuring hamas and, of course, their benefactor? are you surprised at what they did? yeah. i think it's a pleasant surprise. i mean, this is not the government we would have wanted in egypt post-mubarak because they are muslim brotherhood, and there's parts of the muslim brotherhood that is totally alien to us, the salafist movement which are radical islamists, but here he is openly spo
of vermont. we are keeping our eyes on the breaking news coming to us out of cairo. i want to show you live pictures of protesters back in tahrir square today for another day of demonstrations over the egyptian president's effort to assert new powers. the protesters reminiscent of the uprising that took down hosni mubarak two years ago, and we've heard a third protester has died as a result of these protests. n. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. citi price rewind. social security are just numbers thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget dea
to jerusalem and then to cairo. a truce that seemed to be negotiated by israeli bombardment by sea and air and hamas rockets. suddenly the announcement. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. if it holds, rockets must end. >> it turned into bursts of celebration. but in jerusalem they briefed the nation on the deal glum faced. the first bus bombing since 2006 in the heart of tel aviv across the street from the defense ministry. this iet said -- this eyewitness said he thought it was rocket. more than 20 that were wounded they say it was an ide. at least 20 rockets fired out of gaza hours after the deal. >> dan: in gaza tonight, enormous relief. people breaking out into spontaneous celebration. >>> the green flags were raised across the gaza strip. palestinians poured into the streets. >> there is sense of relief on the street but this a victory celebration. after a week of fighting with israel, the palestinians feel like they have won. >> won because for the first time militant groups were able to fire rockets into israel's biggest city, jerusalem and tel a
comes in. she just landed in cairo. she's moving from cairo, jerusalem, ramallah and back. trying to broker some sort of peace here. obviously, this bombing here makes it much more difficult. josh? >> incredibly tense times. we'll have updates all morning long. thank you for that, matt gutman. >>> meanwhile, we're just getting word of more air strikes in gaza. you heard matt refer to them. we'll keep you posted on all of the developments through the morning in the region. >>> now to some big news on wall treat. what's being called the most lucrative insider trading scheme ever. federal authorities have leveled charges against a former po portfolio manager accused of making some $276 million off secret information on alzheimer's drugs. that portfolio manager worked for a hedge fund, owned by one of wall street's billionaire giants, steven cohen. cohen has not been charged. but at least five of his former associates have now been accused of insider trading. we'll have updates on this story, as well. >>> and no deal. that's the word from twinkiemaker, hostess. the company and its str
because morsi hails from the brotherhood, a political cousin to hamas. we are joined from cairo. how are egyptians feeling about this cease-fire this morning? >> reporter: well, if you're the leadership of the muslim brotherhood in cairo you're patting yourself on the back today because they really came out looking very favorably in the international community throughout this process. this is a big test for egypt's government led now but the muslim brotherhood. a talk show host had a lot of concern. would this be a movement that would take up arms? would this be a movement that would give material support for hamas. it turns out that those fears, the way things stand right now turned out to be groundless. it looks like this is a government that's approached this very even handedly to keep their peace treaty and their economic alliances with washington and western capitals. in the end it doesn't look like this is a government that wanted to be seen as radical in the community. >>> back at home u.s. ambassador susan rice is speaking out about those talking points that she delivered on
this in cairo alongside secretary of state, hillary clinton. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, binyamin netanyahu, confirmed the deal saying that he had agreed to give the cease-fire a chance after speaking with president obama. secretary of state, hillary clinton said the united states and egypt will work together in working toward long-term peace in the middle east. listen. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today if a cease-fire in gaza, and now a broader calm returns. >> the truce is hours after a bomb tore through a bus near israel's defense ministry in tel aviv. the explosion injured two dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take responsibility. in gaza, israel struck more than 100 targets including hamas government buildings. officials in the palestinian territory set to strike and killed to dozen including to children. we have coverage from jonathan hunt at the united nations but, first, we go to david lee miller on the ground in southern israel. >>reporter: the question, is the cease-fire going to hold? we are about a mile or so from the israeli an
, by the time it was getting ready to announce it in cairo, there was a great sense of anxiety that, in fact, the truce slipped out of the party's reach because we woke up on tuesday morning, yesterday morning, with a great sense of optimism there will be a cease-fire. by last night, it looked like it was out of reach and a great sense of desperation this morning. in fact, almost a spike of overnight killings. the death toll 146. 34 in one day's count and people this morning were waking up to very different feelings than they were yesterday. soldiers on the border. people very much afraid of a ground invasion. perhaps it was thedy ploy sy of secretary clinton to salvage this. they're not out of woods to use that expression but no sense that this evening will be a lot or at least relatively calmer than it was over the past eight nights. >> coming to the cease-fire and the agreement that was made, what are the conditions that hamas was willing to bring to the table to negotiate with? >> reporter: well, hamas is willing -- hamas and the palestinian factions part of it willing to stop all rocket
, in the hour and a half between the time the announcement was made in cairo and the cease-fire went into effect, we saw increasing numbers of israeli air strikes, artillery barrages into gaza city itself. some of them quite close to where i'm standing. and we saw three separate volley of rockets fired from gaza city toward israel. it did seem as if they were working against the clock to get just a few last whips in or hits in to the other side before the cease-fire went into effect. when it did go into effect, it became very calm, very quiet. then we started to hear celebratory gunfire coming from a bit of the distance from here. but it came closer and closer and we saw more and more cars out on the street. more than we've seen now for the last eight days for quite some time. there were very few cars out. definitely after dark, hardly any. but it went very quickly from pretty quiet to very noisy here in gaza city. >> can you talk about celebratory, some people celebrating that it's over and they could live their lives and they weren't afraid. others possibly celebrating they thought they scored
is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty for killing protesters in masters revolution, they would be retried. president mohammed morsi on the heel
officials, palestinian officials in ramallah. she's now in cairo as well trying to push forward with the cease fire but really since last night, there really has not been much progress or at least public progress towards a cease-fire. in fact, today, at noon, local time, when that bus in tel aviv was hit by a bomb, that really did ratch chet up the tension -- ratchet up the tension quite a lot. in fact, right where i'm standing, after the news spread of the bombing, there was a very large explosion from an israeli air strike just nearby. >> ben, has anyone claimed responsibility for the bus attack? >> reporter: no. nobody actually has. now, initially, there were -- there was -- there are moves in gaza city that were announcing that this was the work of so- called lions from the west bank and some people assumed that because they are coming from hamas, the announcement was coming from hamas-controlled mosques, that hamas was claiming responsibility. no one has claimed responsibility. hamas did quote/unquote bless the operation saying that, according to one hamas official, that it
'm charlie d'agata, gaza city. >>> clachling victory for a different reason. clarissa ward is in cairo where the truce agreement was sealed yesterday. what are the possible sticking points in this new cease fire agreement? >> reporter: good morning, charlie. good morning, gayle. happy thanksgiving. the main sticking point that may arrive with this agreement is that in the third clause of that cease fire agreement that essentially says after a cooling off period israel must start opening up gaza borders and allow for free passage of trade and also people. israel is very reticassant of lifting that blockade. you may see weapons into the hands of militants but hamas is adamant that that blockade needs to be lifted. a few sticking points raised with that one. >> what does the role that egypt played mean for egypt and the region going forward? >> reporter: egypt has definitely emerged as the winner in all of this. secretary of state clinton calling it a cornerstone of stability in the region. and i think the west had been a little bit concerned about how egypt's recentl
. it was announced yesterday by the egyptian foreign minister in cairo, at a joint press conference with secretary clinton we heard her there. he announced hostilities would stop at 9:00 p.m. local time. both sides, israel and hamas were still attacking each other to the last moment. israeli radio said some rockets were fired from gaza into southern israel, shortly after the cease-fire came, but no sign of israeli response or israeli retaliation. but since midnight, the idf, israeli defense forces say no rockets were fired from gaza. so far, the truce seems to be holding. we're over 11 hours into the cease-fire agreement, and it seems to be holding. but the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu warned of more severe action if the truce doesn't hold, if israeli citizens are unable to live in peace from the incoming rockets from hamas threatening them. if that happens, the israeli government would take severe action. they are using the opportunity to achieve a long lasting cease-fire. one senior israeli official said the threat of a ground invasion will remain in that case. he says we can alway
. >> secretary of state clinton has arrived in cairo egypt and met with president mohammed morse i. the chances of them reaching a deal about the issues surrounding gaz are are extremely unlikely. they're looking to avert a ground war. >> thank you very much. here's savannah. >> matt, thanks. meantime, black friday is two days away now. the most important day of the year foror the nation's retaile. trouble may be brewing for one of the biggest ones of all. walmart. mark potter is live in doral, florida this morning. mark, good morning. >> good morning, savannah. about a thousand protests are scheduled around the country and walmart is trying to stop them. most of them will be happening on the busiest shopping day of the year. >> we are the workers! the mighty walmart workers! >> a few of the protests have begun. >> this one tuesday out outside a walmart near los angeles. store workers and stoare complaining about hours and retaliati retaliation. >> the wages are low. sometimes we have to rely on family help. >> they're very good with the prices. but the prices are coming out our pockets. >> som
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)